New Analytic Expert Blog Highlights Gas and Liquid Analyzer Experience

I wanted to highlight a new Emerson Process Management blog, Analytic Expert. This blog is a team effort by Rosemount Analytical product and application experts. Here’s background on the four bloggers listed on the About Us page.

Jim Gray has worked as an application manager for more than 20 years. Fifteen years ago, his role expanded to include support and development for HART, Fieldbus, and Profibus devices and software. I’ve highlighted Jim’s expertise a couple of posts here on this blog. In his introductory post, Let’s Talk Wireless, he shares the purpose behind the Analytic Expert blog:

The purpose of this blog is to discuss the application of liquid and gas analyzers and systems. It will also serve to introduce new approaches to these applications made possible by new developments in analyzer hardware and software. It is hoped that we can begin a conversation that will provide you with new insights that will make it possible to apply analyzers more effectively, reliably, and at a lower installed cost. Because we cover a large range of topics, the blog will not always be written by the same person as we want to include experts to comment on their own subjects. You will get to know all of us over time. We want to hear from you with comments and suggestions on what you would like us to cover.

Daniel Benitez helps to drive research and development of analytic products, as well as oversee global marketing. Daniel tackles the subject of gas chromatograph cost of ownership in his first post.

Dave Joseph, whom you may recall from several pH-related posts, supports the “heavy” industries such as chemical, refining, pulp and paper, and metals and mining in his role as senior industry manager. Analytical products are used in common situations such as neutralization and leak detection, and very specific applications like removing free fatty acids in biodiesel production. His first post, Calibration Got You Down? is about pH sensor maintenance.

Doug Simmers has been the expert behind several combustion-related posts on this blog. He is the worldwide product manager for the Rosemount Analytical line of combustion analyzers and has spent 27 years providing process controls and instrumentation to the power, refining, and pulp and paper industries.

It’s great to see the newest bloggers in the Emerson Process Management group already finding their voice. I don’t think I could have gotten away with referring to Doug as a “Combustion Geek”, as he has done in the most recent post, The Combustion Geek. In the post, he tackles some of the mistrust issues around analyzers. He observes:

…reasons for this mistrust that can be overcome by better understanding of how they work, and what to expect from them. For example, unlike many other measurements, most gas analyzers can be calibrated automatically on-line with the process running, with calibration gases sequenced to the sensors and adjustments made via microprocessors.

If you have liquid and gas analytical instrumentation in your plant, you will want to subscribe to the Analytic Expert RSS feed to be alerted when new posts by Jim, Daniel, Dave, and Doug become available.

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2 comments

  1. RGAs would also be used as sensitive in-situ, helium leak detectors. With vacuum systems pumped down to lower than 10 – 5Torr air leaks, virtual leaks and other contaminants at low levels may be detected before a process is initiated.

    • Thanks for sharing this section on residual gas analyzers from the page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual_gas_analyzer

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